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20131202
20131210
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CSPAN 7
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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 11:00pm EST
.remely other concerns involved in the u.s., has a national security agencies monitoring and mitigation scheme to diplomatic relations between colombia and the u.s.? -- monitoring communications, kate e maddock between clinton and the u.s.? between colombia and the u.s.? >> we share with the u.s. and other intelligence agencies all of the information in there for spied therefore if we had on our common enemies, it has been done with the cooperation of the colombian authorities and u.s. authorities. information off spying outside that spirit of cooperation. if i knew about that, of course i would condemn it immediately. >> some of your neighbors in latin america have been furious by revelations of u.s. eavesdropping. is there anger justified? >> nobody likes to be spied. , if some and spies on you, you have all the right to get mad. they are spying without permission. to china, china's investment in latin america continues to grow. the country signed bilateral agreements last week. can you tell us more about that columbia-china economic relationship? do you see the effect it would have on that
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 10:00am EST
recently with the national security agency eavesdropping disclosures. he said he was not aware the united states was eavesdropping on a german chancellor's personal cell phone. the glitches to the health care website is another that he has acknowledged he was not prepared for. on their own, these may seem relatively minor, but added up, you get the perception of a white house and a management team that is trying to do a lot of different things at the same time and not necessarily paying attention to the implementation of these major policy issues, whether national security in the case of the nsa, or whether it is his health care law, which is legacy. is it people not wanting to tell the president bad news? is he not willing to surround tell himith people who that things are wrong? there was a lot of bad news not shared with the president. this goes back to this year, the irs inspector general's report about paying particular attention to conservative groups. that, not aware of told of that, even though senior staff knew. surroundedy, he himself by people that he knew. he did not have many
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 7:45am EST
, give us a call. guest: with the national security agency's eavesdropping ask posers your car he was saying here is not aware that the united states is eavesdropping on the german chancellor's personal cell phone. obviously the glitches to the health care website is another that he has acknowledged he was not prepared for. on their own, these may seem relatively minor, but added up you get the perception of a white house and a management team there that is trying to do a lot of different things at the same time and not speaking for the american people. he wasn't speaking for insurance companies. this does make him a liar. i just want to talk about legacy. it can be before he leaves office or after. is going to rule obama and hillary. they were trying to protect votes through consistent lives using various people as spokespeople and also, the perception they did not need -- they were so successful in we do not have to increase security. the second issue, another 15 seconds and i'm done. the of audible care at is nothing more than a trojan horse , the getting reparations for slaver
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 7:00am EST
was concerned with raining and the national security agency they would have to go after the funding. congress must be happy the way things are going because they don't seem to want to do anything about it. that is all i have to say. robert is on our line for independents. caller: i would like to i heard asay that recent blurb regarding president obama's attempt to rein in nsa surveillance. rathertly think it is disingenuous. it doesn't really matter what administration is in office. council,nal security these are agencies that are so entrenched in our government. they basically operate through a black budget. a lot of money that was siphoned through taxes are going to be totally off the books. it doesn't matter what any president or any policy -- they want to operate independent of the administration and the office. beware of the military and industrial complex. bob is on our line for democrats. caller: i would like to remind folks that when george bush was trying to pass to this -- pass this patriots act, the big response to people worried about losing their freedom or thatty's or whatever w
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 12:35am EST
, with the director of national intelligence, with the fbi, with the nsa, with the national security council, and with the pentagon. this country it's included downing street, the cabinet office, the national security advisor, gchq themselves, and the dinas committee. we've consulted more than 100 times with the agencies in order to be aware of their concerns before we published them. >> and so i suppose my question is, have you gone through all of the 53,000 documents? and have some been excluded from publication? will they not be appearing. have others been put in the yes, okay for publication? >> i think -- in terms of publishing documents, i think we've published 26. >> i'm referring to the ones which have not yet been. >> we did a few more pages of documents that have been redacted. i would not expect us to publish a huge amount of more. 26 over six months. >> what about the ones that have been communicated to the united states. because i understand some of those, the names have been redacted and some of them haven't. how did you go about deciding which names to redact and which not --
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 10:00pm EST
house, with the director of national intelligence, with he fbi, with the nsa, with the national security council, and with the pentagon. this country it's included downing street, the cabinet security e national advisor, gchq themselves, and dinas committee. we've consulted more than 100 times with the agencies in order be aware of their concerns before we published them. so i suppose my question is, have you gone through all of 53,000 documents? and have some been excluded from publication? will they not be appearing. have others been put in the yes, publication? >> i think -- in terms of ublishing documents, i think we've published 26. >> i'm referring to the ones yet been. not >> we did a few more pages of ocuments that have been redacted. publishnot expect us to a huge amount of more. 26 over six months. the ones that have been communicated to the united states. because i understand some of hose, the names have been redacted and some of them haven't. how did you go about deciding names to redact and which not -- the guardian ear, has not used any names. in the rare occasion where we'
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 12:30pm EST
are and what we are doing on behalf of national security. to give you some idea about the 5irection of one of the big agencies that we have that are every day, 24 hours a day, seven days a week in 142 countries around the world with 17,000 people, doing the nation's business. we have some talented men and women and i will talk about them. john, thank you very much. i want to thank for the great introduction. i want to thank the institute of world politics and the staff that puts these things on. it is important that we keep doing i think it is a really important endeavor that we keep doing this. politicstute of world and your personal dedication to hosting this annual lecture is a testament to the institute's commitment to training a new generation of critical thinkers. the professionals in this room who recognize the value of studying history when confronting modern issues of national security and world politics. as early as 1932, there was a which begins with a surprise attack on pearl harbor. part of the curriculum. i have a graduate degree. in march of 1931, intelligence reports warn o
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7